Between Things

Everyone’s enjoying the ‘Between Things’ exhibition at the Minories Galleries 74 High Street, Colchester Essex CO1 1UE. It runs until 10th June 2017; open Monday to Saturday 10am-5pm.

Just thought I would let you know about our
CATALOGUE LAUNCH
which is taking place
13th May 2-5pm at the Minories
designed by the brilliant Marcia Mihotich with essays by the erudite and perceptive Linda Theophilus and Kath Wood,
and a conversation between me and Kaavous Clayton.

The catalogue will answer all your questions.

PLEASE COME Thank you
Ben

 

Linda Theophilus, Kaavous Clayton and Kath Wood – three generations of directors of the Minories Art Gallery all appearing in our catalogue

L-R work by Sharon Leahy-Clark, ParisEssex and Stafford Schmool

Dates for your diary: two gripping and probably seminal discussions. You have to be there.

in conversation
Saturday 3 June 2pm
Linda Theophilus, Freddie Robins and Celia Pym
will discuss the exhibition and their work

in conversation
Saturday 10 June 2pm
Kath Wood, Ben Coode-Adams and Sharon Leahy-Clark
will discuss the exhibition and their work

‘Between Things’ exhibition at the Minories in Colchester, genuine Essex

 

 

 

 

BETWEEN THINGS

an exhibition with work by artists:

Ben Coode-Adams

Will Cruickshank

Clare Iles

Sharon Leahy-Clark

ParisEssex

Celia Pym

Freddie Robins

Stafford Schmool

 

exhibition open

Saturday 15 April to Saturday 10 June 2017

Monday to Saturday 10am to 5pm

preview

Saturday 15 April 2 to 6pm

open to the public admission free

 

Devised & designed by Kaavous Clayton & Ben Coode-Adams

Together Kaavous Clayton and I have come up with a scintillating exhibition. It reflects some of our shared areas of interest over the last few years; colour, pattern, scale, craft, powerful god figures, very fine sanding and wool. You know, all the – ‘whoa hold on tiger’ – bits of art/design/craft (definitions are all a bit blurry in this show – no helpful hierarchies) that send a shiver down your spine.

The galleries at the Minories will be completely transformed – I know you’ve heard that before but this time it’s true. We’ve new walls, floors and ceilings to transport you to aesthetic joy. Panoplies of wood and wool in combination and separately. And thoroughly detailed paintings. New perspectives will unfold in delightful and enchanting combinations that will make you want to come back again and again.

Thank you so much to Kaavous, the Minories staff and Colchester Institute for hosting this exhibition. Thank you to the Arts Council for funding us, to make and show new work and produce a catalogue. And thank you to all the artists for making great work and allowing us to show it. Thank you to Nicol Wilson for all your hard work. And thanks to you people for making the effort to come to the show.

 

‘Watercolour Now’ at the Sentinel Gallery and the Sunday Times Watercolour Prize

‘Watercolour Now’

I am in a wonderful exhibition at the Sentinel Gallery in Wivenhoe. I was delighted to be asked to participate by Jane Lewis. It has some great work in it, most of which I was unfamiliar with. I love seeing new work. It is a beautifully hung show with delightful and intelligent juxtapositions, put together by Pru Green and Rosie Harman. There are some fascinating correspondences between abstract and figurative work which I really like. It runs until 25th September so do see if you can make it down.

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Here’s me with my painting ‘Moon boy’, a James Faure Walker and a Clive Davis plate.

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A cracking group with two of my paintings, two by Jane Lewis and one by James Faure Walker

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A great corner with my painting ‘Apollo Garden’ on the left; Bridget Moore’s ‘Yellow Room’ and Caroline McAdam Clark’s ‘Promised Land’ and more ceramics by Clive Davis. Bridget’s work has a Sickert like use of dark but the lightness of touch of Bonnard. Caroline’s landscape uses intriguing and beguiling patterns combined with collage elements. Both are really lovely.

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On the right here are Gertie Young’s wonderfully whimsical landscapes always with a dark shadow of looming evil lurking in the background. And on the left Wendy Jacob’s sand dune. The exhibition also features the work of Debbie Ayles whose work I couldn’t photograph very well but she is the featured artist at the Minories shop in Colchester at the moment.

jane-lewis-a4-v1

 

In further Watercolour News I have been shortlisted for the Sunday Times Watercolour Prize. Hurrah! The shortlisted works will be shown at the Mall Galleries, London from 19 – 24 September 2016, and will continue to tour to venues across the UK, including Parabola Arts centre, Cheltenham (24 – 29 October 2016) and Guildford House Gallery, Guildford (10 December 2016 – 28 January 2017). Below is my painting ‘Lily White Boys’ which made the cut. The title refers to the English folk song ‘Green Grow the Rushes – Ho’ which is obscure in meaning but vivid in imagery. I like to peer behind the curtain of the obvious. I like not knowing.

 

lily-white-boys-copy

First resident in our Silo starts today: Mil Stricevic

Mil Stricevic is arriving from Glasgow today to start our first residency in our completed Silo. He will be working with our Professor of Wood, Nicol Wilson, on a new Sonic Vista bench updated from the 2002 project Mil and I undertook in Barrow-in-Furness.  Hopefully the prototype will be available for our Open Studio. It will then be pimped by Simon Emery at the Paintbox.

silo

balustrade

Balustrade made of sweet chestnut and cherry harvested by Alex Morton (@alex.gardenlore) and Mike Polom (@hugsparty), built by Nicol Wilson with David Howe.

 

Mil

 

Mil Stricevic in 2002 with the original Sonic Vista bench in Barrow-in-Furness

Line-up for Open Studios is developing nicely…

We are very excited to announce our line-up for the Open Studios. As is usual, it being our Open Studio, Freddie Robins and Ben Coode-Adams will be the lynch-pins, the mainstays, the eye of the storm, the still centre, the big end. We will have a larger selection of old work for sale at bargain bucket prices than ever as well as the new stuff. I feel I am becoming better and better at painting, so the new ones are really worth owning:-)

We are delighted to announce that renowned international artist Julie Arkell will be showing her work with us. Julie has spent the last forty years developing a practice based around papier maché. She has that commitment to craft in her medium and fluidity in ‘thinking through doing’ that we value most highly. She interweaves folk traditions with popular culture to create a unique, striking, sometimes sinister, personal mythology. Her work might be described as comfort ‘toys’ for a demented age. Twisted childhood memories combine with a delightful, inventive use of materials. Like many women artists her work scares the shit out of the male dominated art world.

That mythology permeates her whole life, her home, and her clothes. She is having a good clean out and will be bringing forty years worth of studio bits and bobs for sale. This is a rare, if not unique event, and Julie’s first showing in Essex for many years. So get the look!

'May, Pixie, Stanley' Julie Arkell

‘May, Pixie, Stanley’ Julie Arkell

We are open 1st & 2nd October 2016 11am-6pm Feering Bury Farm Barn, Coggeshall Road, Feering, Colchester Essex CO5 9RB. You are welcome.

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Open Studio announced for 1st & 2nd October 2016

chewbacca
We’re excited to announce our Open Studio event is scheduled for 1st & 2nd October 2016 11am-6pm. We will hold our famous café run by kids (now the kids are a year older) with the cheapest cup of tea for miles around, £1 including a biscuit.

Our museum will be properly open this year.

More details later, including the line-up of artists. Quiver with anticipation.

flushed away

some rocks & a hard place

Freddie Robins and I are very excited to announce that we are having a joint exhibition at the Sentinel Gallery in Wivenhoe running from 30th April to 30th May so including both Bank Holidays for which the gallery will be open. We are showing new work and many unseen gems all at very special prices!

There is a regular train to Wivenhoe from London Liverpool Street. Wivenhoe itself is a charming town with delightful coastal walks and good pubs. It is well worth a visit. The Sentinel Gallery is a great space owned and built by Pru Green. We’d love to see you.

some rocks & a hard place
An exhibition of art by Ben Coode-Adams and Freddie Robins at the Sentinel Gallery
Chapel Road, Wivenhoe, Essex, CO7 9DX
30th April-30th May: Wednesday to Sunday, 10am – 5pm and Bank Holidays
info@thesentinelgallery.co.uk
01206 827490
www.thesentinelgallery.co.uk

 

Press Release

some rocks & a hard place

 

fingers

some rocks

Freddie Robins is a true artistic heavy weight, an authentic ‘badass’. She questions all your assumptions about wool, women, comfort and nurturing by undermining and exploding them in her art. But then the truth of our existence, as opposed to our rose-tinted hopes, is unmanageable, often unapproachable and always ominous. For Robins nestling up to truth is an artistic goal where art is the shadow of life.

Her new work involves the use of flints. These stones, geologically enigmatic, their formation a mystery, litter the farm where Robins lives. She collects the ones that look like witches’ gnarled fingers. The oscillation between cosy warm fluffy wool and flinty hard unyielding stone is surprising, uncomfortable and pregnant with secret power.

glove and flint

Robins lives in the area of Essex scourged by Mathew Hopkins the self-styled Witch-Finder General. He executed roughly 300 women for witchcraft in three short years . These severed witches’ fingers, cherty fragments of murdered women, retain their crystalline power multiplied by being restored to their hand sister form.

Dr. Catherine Dormor, who is an artist, Lecturer and Research Co-ordinator at Middlesex University, writes of Robins’ work:

Freddie Robins offers a challenge to the notion of knitting as a passive, benign activity.

Robins brings conformity to subversion, setting knitting not as an activity of safety and comfort-production, but rather as a series of actions and processes through which identity and subjectivity can be formed and expressed. Robins upsets notions of utilitarianism in favour of artistic expressionism, function, and form in favour of conceptual rigor. In so doing she rejects craft-art arguments as irrelevant and misplaced borderlines.

a hard place

Ben Coode-Adams is the hard man of watercolour. His paintings do not conform to the stereotype of old-fashioned amateurish en plein air landscapes.  His paintings are rigorous and uncompromising even dangerous. Coode-Adams likes it when things are unexpected. The paints he uses are ground up gems stones that have unpredictable chemical reactions. On one level he is painting just to see what happens. His imagery bubbles up through the paint surface.

woman and shadow

above: The ventriloquist and her shadow Watercolour on paper 2016

In Coode-Adams’ paintings small-time gods emerge from the warp and weft of a multidimensional universe. For him the act of painting is a spirit-journey where he blindly gropes towards a fully formed image that he can’t quite grasp. The image has to be painstakingly constructed of veils spun from the lower world.

George Ferrandi, Director of Wayfarers Gallery in Brooklyn New York writes of Coode-Adams’ work:

Ben Coode-Adams makes mystical watercolour paintings of spirit world / Sasquatch – like figures adorned with or comprised of tribal patterns that seep off of the characters and into the spaces around them. The figures are often defined by solid colours and patterns, but rarely by outline, leaving them ephemeral and weightless. It’s as if the landscape were passing through them while they were passing through it. They are edgeless – both with regards to the laws of physics and with regards to the limits of Ben’s inventive mark-making. These watery spirits co-exist with giant magical trees and small crying people – presenting boundless sorrow, but also unlimited joy. The resulting vibrant works on paper look beautiful. But they feel beautiful, too.

These painting come from a body of work made while Coode-Adams has been suffering from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E). This disease meant he could not undertake any physical work but he has been able to paint. As his health has improved he has been bingeing on paint.

biography

Freddie Robins studied at Middlesex Polytechnic and the Royal College. Ben Coode-Adams studied at Edinburgh University and Edinburgh College of Art. Both artists exhibit internationally. Ben is from Essex. They moved to the family farm eight years ago where they built their own house and studio. They both share a deep love of Essex, a maligned and under appreciated county; which can’t escape being between a rock and a hard place.

Sluice__ 2015 Art Fair

In 2014 we went international because only in relation to others is the local local. We went to find fellow travellers and learn from them, people who work with extreme craft skill, poetic agility, and actual real in-your-face objects, artists not always very visible in the UK. We went Swedish at the amazing and inspiring University of Gothenburg Högskolan för Design och Konsthantverk in Steneby, where hardcore skills are taught alongside Bauhausian design courses. It is the mother-lode of all the values we hold dear.

We went Lithuanian at the Vilniaus Dailės Akademija where Soviet era national identity is being re-crafted, where loving the local is a bulwark against the juggernaut neighbours. We went American, with Wayfarers and Theodore:Art in Brooklyn and Season in Seattle.

We developed a long term relationship with Brooklyn based performance artist George Ferrandi who works with performance, vulnerability, impermanence, fallibility and spectacle, often through experimental approaches to story-telling. Employing a unique humour and a deep sense of humanity, her work is filled with love. She has sent us a parcel of extraordinariness to show at  #Sluice__ 2015  from Japan where she has been working for the last few months.

As director of the Brooklyn gallery Wayfarers George Ferrandi  introduced me to Brent Owens with whom I exhibited at Wayfarers in 2014. It was a very happy pairing and so we decided to includes Brent’s work in our #Sluice __2015 presentation.

George describes ‘Brent Owens’ sculpture [as] ambitious and delicately clunky – appropriating the rough-hewn aesthetic of chain-sawed country bears or driftwood sculptures, but applying those sensibilities to less much predictable imagery – like ice cream cones, loaves of bread, submarine sandwiches or piles of hair.’ All I am saying is Zombie Toast…

In 2014 Freddie Robins was deeply embedded in the English Folk Song and Dance Society. We have taken this engagement as a spring board for our psycho-folk theme for our 2015 Sluice__ presentation which could be embodied in the paintings of Simon Collins whose mysterious allegories and parables chart his personal journey though love and history.

If you’re going to be rural you might as well get right down in the bosky mire with the faeries, sprites and spirits. We embrace the pink shiny glittery as well as the massive scary teeth, truly awesome power of death wielding elementals. It’s not nice in the woods.

Hope to see you there, all the best Ben

Invite Sluice 15 general

We are open this Sunday 27th September 11am-5pm for more ‘Brocki’ fun

Just to remind you we are open this Sunday 27th September 11am-5pm for more ‘Brocki’ fun and we would love to see you. Thank you to all the people who came last Sunday. It was real fun. And thank you to all our artists who have worked so hard to make the ‘Brocki’ so great.  I’d love to sell the inflatable dinosaurs. They are a wonderful collection but are now outside our collecting remit.

dinos

Inflatable dinosaurs: various species

gallery

View in the gallery with my work, Freddie Robins, Dale Devereux Barker, &Sara Impey,

house

View of the barn with Dale Devereux Barker, Rebecca Weaver and Lucy Tiffney round the corner

Mollie

 

Simon Collins’s painting ‘Mollie’ with a Dale Devereux Barker print. Amanda Emery’s Ford Falcon put together by Simon Emery